Signaling Pathway Research Unit

Unit Leader

Lam-Son Phan Tran

Ph.D.

Lam-Son Phan Tran

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1997
Ph.D., Szent Istvan University, Hungary
1997
Researcher, Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Genetics, Szent Istvan University, Hungary
1998
Senior Researcher, Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Genetics, Szent Istvan University, Hungary
1998
STA Postdoctoral Fellow, Applied Bacteriology Laboratory, Division of Microbiology, National Food Research Institute, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
2001
JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Microbial Cell Biology, Graduate School of Biological Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology
2001
JIRCAS Fellow, Biological Resources Division, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS)
2003
Special Researcher, Biological Resources Division, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences
2007
Senior Research Scientist, Soybean Genomics and Biotechnology Laboratory, Division of Plant Science, National Center for Soybean Biotechnology, University of Missouri-Columbia, USA
2009
Unit Leader, Signaling Pathway Research Unit, RIKEN Plant Science Center
2013
Unit Leader, Signaling Pathway Research Unit, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (-current)

Contact

Son.Tran

Signaling Pathway Research Unit,
RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science

#E610 6F East Research Building,
1-7-22 Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 Japan
Access to Yokohama

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Outline

The population of the earth is rapidly increasing, setting food security one of the major issues in the world, especially in developing countries. Additionally, climate changes also put a great burden on food production. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high salinity, soil erosion and pollutants are the factors affecting yield and stability of crop production, thereby threatening sustainable agriculture. Our unit has interest in (i) studying the roles of plant growth regulators, including various hormones and polyamines, and their interactions in abiotic stress responses, as well as (ii) translational genomics aiming to enhance crop productivity under adverse environmental stress conditions.

Subjects

  1. Molecular elucidation of cytokinins and cytokinin signaling in drought and salt stress responses
  2. Co-operative functions of brassinosteroids and polyamines in heavy metal stress responses
  3. Functional genomics of food crops for improvement of the crop productivity in adverse conditions
Model of relationship among CKs, ABA and abiotic stress response.
Upon abiotic stress, IPT gene expression is reduced, leading to decrease in CK contents. The stress-induced ABA levels also downregulate expression of AtIPT genes which causes further decrease in CK contents. Due to a reduction of CK content, the inhibitory effect of CK signaling on the expression of stress responsive genes is alleviated (dotted bar), leading to enhanced plant survival.
Evaluation of plant phenotypes