Cell Function Research Team

Team Leader

Keiko Sugimoto

Ph.D.

Keiko Sugimoto

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ResearcherID

2000
Ph.D., Australian National University, Australia
2000
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, John Innes Centre, UK
2003
Japan Society for Promotion of Science Fellow, John Innes Centre, UK
2005
Group Leader, John Innes Centre, UK
2007
Unit Leader, Cell Function Research Unit, RIKEN Plant Science Center
2012
Team Leader, Cell Function Research Team, RIKEN Plant Science Center
2013
Team Leader, Cell Function Research Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (-current)

Contact

keiko.sugimoto

Cell Function Research Team,
RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science

#E612 6F East Research Building,
1-7-22 Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 Japan
TEL: +81-(0)45-503-9575
FAX: +81-(0)45-503-9591
Access to Yokohama

Related links

Research information prior to FY2012, please refer to the above archive.

Outline

Cell Function Research Team
What controls ‘size’ in biological systems is a fundamental question but the intrinsic mechanism that mediates this control remains largely unknown. The goal of our research is to unravel genetic mechanisms that determine cell and organ size in plants and to explore new strategies to improve yield and quality of economically important plant species. Cell and organ size in plants is defined by highly dynamic, intersecting signalling pathways that involve genetic, hormonal and environmental cues. We identify sets of genes that act in these pathways and unravel complex regulatory networks that control size in higher plants.

Subjects

  1. Genetic dissection of cell-size control in plants
  2. Identification of molecular components that control organ size in plants
  3. Chemical genetic screening of plant cell size/organ size modulators
The shoot apical meristem in Arabidopsis
As cells leave the meristem, they switch from the mitotic cycle to the endoreduplication cycle and start to differentiate.
The leaf trichome cell in Arabidopsis
Arabidopsis trichome cells increase their cell volume hundreds of times their original size through endoreduplication.